Efficacy of an HIV/STI Sexual Risk-Reduction Intervention for African American Adolescent Girls in Juvenile Detention Centers: A Randomized Controlled Trial
DOI: 10.1080/03630242.2014.932893
Title: Efficacy of an HIV/STI Sexual Risk-Reduction Intervention for African American Adolescent Girls in Juvenile Detention Centers: A Randomized Controlled Trial
Journal Title: Women & Health
Volume: Volume 54
Issue: Issue 8
Publication Date: November 2014
Start Page: 726
End Page: 749
Published online: 6 Nov 2014
ISSN: 0363-0242
Author: Ralph J. DiClemente PhDabc*, Teaniese L. Davis PhDab, Andrea Swartzendruber PhDab, Amy M. Fasula PhDd, Lorin Boyce MAa, Deborah Gelaude PhDd, Simone C. Gray PhDd, James Hardin PhDe, Eve Rose MSPHab, Monique Carry PhDd, Jessica M. Sales PhDab, Jennifer L. Brown PhDab & Michelle Staples-Horne MDaf
Affiliations:
a Emory University Rollins School of Public Health, Department of Behavioral Sciences and Health Education, Atlanta, Georgia, USA
b Center for AIDS Research, Atlanta, Georgia, USA
c Emory University School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics (Division of Infectious Diseases, Epidemiology and Immunology), Atlanta, Georgia, USA
d Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA
e Epidemiology and Biostatistics Department, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina, USA
f Georgia Department of Juvenile Justice, Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Abstract: Few HIV/STI interventions exist for African American adolescent girls in juvenile detention. The objective was to evaluate the Efficacy of an intervention to reduce incident STIs, improve HIV-preventive behaviors, and enhance psychosocial outcomes. We conducted a randomized controlled trial among African American adolescent girls (13–17 years, N = 188) in juvenile detention from March 2011 to May 2012. Assessments occurred at baseline and 3- and 6-months post-randomization and included: audio computer-assisted self-interview, condom skills assessment, and self-collected vaginal swab to detect Chlamydia and gonorrhea. The Imara intervention included three individual-level sessions and four phone sessions; expedited partner therapy was offered to STI-positive adolescents. The comparison group received the usual care provided by the detention center: STI testing, treatment, and counseling. At the 6-month assessment (3-months post-intervention), Imara participants reported higher condom use self-Efficacy (p < 0.001), HIV/STI knowledge (p < 0.001), and condom use skills (p < 0.001) compared to control participants. No significant differences were observed between trial conditions in incident Chlamydia or gonorrhea infections, condom use, or number of vaginal sex partners. Imara for detained African American adolescent girls can improve condom use skills and psychosocial outcomes; however, a critical need for interventions to reduce sexual risk remains.
Accepted: 27 Apr 2014

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