Comparative study of field and laboratory evaluations of the ethnobotanical Cassia sophera L. (Leguminosae) for bioactivity against the storage pests Callosobruchus maculatus (F.) (Coleoptera: Bruchidae) and Sitophilus oryzae (L.) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)
DOI: 10.1016/j.jspr.2005.11.003
Title: Comparative study of field and laboratory evaluations of the ethnobotanical Cassia sophera L. (Leguminosae) for bioactivity against the storage pests Callosobruchus maculatus (F.) (Coleoptera: Bruchidae) and Sitophilus oryzae (L.) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)
Journal Title: Journal of Stored Products Research
Volume: 43
Issue: 1
Publication Date: 2007
Start Page: 79
End Page: 86
Published online: online 28 February 2006
ISSN: 0022-474X
Author: Cristina Kestenholza, Philip C. Stevensonab, Steven R. Belmaina
Affiliations:

  • a Natural Resources Institute, University of Greenwich, Chatham Maritime, Kent ME4 4TB, UK

  • b Jodrell Laboratory, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, Surrey TW9 3DS, UK
  • Abstract: ered leaves of Cassia sophera along with hot- and cold-water leaf extracts of this plant were tested in laboratory experiments in the UK and in field trials in Tamale, Northern Ghana, using traditional storage containers, to determine their inhibitory and toxic effects against Sitophilus oryzae and Callosobruchus maculatus infestation of stored rice and cowpea, respectively. Laboratory and field experiments with cowpea showed that the use of C. sophera hot-water extracts was more effective at reducing C. maculatus infestation and adult emergence on cowpea than the traditional leaf-powder application (1% and 5% w/w) or the use of a cold-water extract of C. sophera. Hot-water extracts of C. sophera might be a more effective technique of applying the plant material on to stored cowpea than using powdered C. sophera leaves, the currently used application by small-scale farmers. In contrast, experiments with S. oryzae on rice showed that C. sophera leaf powder (5% w/w) effectively reduced adult emergence in the laboratory, but this could not be confirmed under field conditions. The hot and dry climatic conditions in the field might impart a natural protection against rice infestation by S. oryzae, making the use of protectants and pesticides less necessary for farmers. This was supported by the negligible rice grain damage after 6 months of field storage and by the failure of the S. oryzae population to establish itself under field conditions. The implications of using botanicals in pest control are discussed.
    Accepted: 17 November 2005
    Tel: +44?0?1634?883212
    Fax: +44?0?1634?883379
    Email: P.C.Stevenson@gre.ac.uk

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