Potential Costs and Benefits of Newborn Screening for Severe Combined Immunodeficiency
DOI: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2005.06.001
Title: Potential Costs and Benefits of Newborn Screening for Severe Combined Immunodeficiency
Journal Title: The Journal of Pediatrics
Volume: 147
Issue: 5
Publication Date: November 2005
Start Page: 603
End Page: 608
Published online: online 13 November 2005
ISSN: 0022-3476
Affiliations:
  • From the Department of Pediatrics and the Department of Human Genetics, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, Calif
  • Accepted: 2 June 2005
    Received: 24 November 2004
    Revised: 5 May 2005
    Keywords: BMT, Bone marrow transplantation; IVIG, Intravenous immune globulin; QALY, Quality-adjusted year of life; QALYs, Quality-adjusted year of life saved; SCID, Severe combined immunodeficiency
    Result: Assuming society is willing to pay $50,000 for every quality-adjusted life-year saved, a SCID screening test that cost less than $5 with a false-negative rate of 0.9% and a false-positive rate of 0.4% would be considered cost-effective. A nationwide screening program would cost an additional $23.9 million per year for screening costs but would result in 760 years of life saved per year of screening. The cost to detect 1 case of SCID would be $485,000.ConclusionSCID screening could result in a large benefit to detected individuals, making screening relatively cost-effective in spite of the low incidence of the disease. However, an adequate test is critical to cost-effectiveness.
    Email: smcghee@mednet.ucla.edu

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